Why You Need a Professional Patent Illustrator

First time inventors often ask if they really need to hire a professional patent illustrator to draw their idea.  Hiring a certified patent illustrator is not only important to the success of your patent application, but a huge time saver…and headache deterrent for you. Career inventors and multiple patent owners agree: professional patent illustrators not only protect your design from USPTO rejection, but can often spot inconsistencies that an IP attorney might miss.

A professional patent illustrator is important because they make it their business to stay informed about current USPTO Standards for Drawings.  Those standards start with utilizing the most widely accepted drawing method: black and white line art.  Black and white drawings also known as line art must be used for patent drawing submissions.  Today’s professional patent Illustrators also use modern software to help them quickly create precise drawings that meet ink requirements while simultaneously adhering to other strict USPTO drawing standards.

For patent drawings to be accepted, they must also include:

  • Identification of the drawings: Identifying indicia should include the title of the invention, inventor’s name, and application number, or docket number (if any) if an application number has not been assigned to the application. If this information is provided, it must be placed on the front of each sheet within the top margin.
  • Graphic forms in drawings. Chemical or mathematical formulas, tables, and waveforms may be submitted as drawings and are subject to the same requirements as drawings. Each chemical or mathematical formula must be labeled as a separate figure, using brackets when necessary, to show that information is properly integrated.
  • Margins. The sheets must not contain frames around the sight (i.e., the usable surface). Each sheet must include top and left side margins of at least 2.5 cm., a right side margin of at least 1.5 cm., and a bottom margin of at least 1.0 cm., thereby leaving a sight no greater than 17.0 cm. by 26.2 cm. on DIN size A4 drawing sheets, and a sight no greater than 17.6 cm. by 24.4 cm. (6 15/16 by 9 5/8 inches) on 21.6 cm. by 27.9 cm. (8 1/2 by 11 inch) drawing sheets.
  • Views. Patent drawings must contain as many views as necessary to show the invention. They may be plan, elevation, section, or perspective views. Detail views of portions of elements, on a larger scale if necessary, may also be used. All views of the drawing must be grouped together and arranged on the sheet(s) without wasting space, preferably in an upright position, clearly separated from one another, and must not be included in the sheets containing the specifications, claims, or abstract.

There are many more specific USPTO guidelines including the arrangement of the views, scaling, symbols, and legends.  Still wondering why you might need a professional patent Illustrator?  Read the General Information Concerning Patents here, and contact Inventia Patent Drafting for help today.

Design or Utility?

There are two main types of patents granted by the U.S. Patent Office: design patents and utility patents.

Utility patents offer greater benefits than design patents.  Utility patents  protect the way an article is used and works.  Utility patents also allow many variations of the article to be claimed in one patent, making utility patents much more broad than design patents.  Utility patents can also be filed provisionally whereas design drawings cannot.

Design patents protect the appearance of the article.  Design patents are usually much cheaper than utility patents and are much easier to obtain.   If the main feature of you invention is the ornamental design, then a design patent is all you need to protect your invention.

We suggest you seek advice from a patent attorney to figure out which type of protection is best for your patent.