Archives for August 2012

Why NOT to use Invent Help Companies like Davidson to Patent Your Invention

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Although their advertisements promise to make it simple to submit an idea, there are a lot of things that companies like Davidson, Invent Help, and other lesser known invention patent “simplifying specialists” do not tell you.  Before diving in and expecting to make millions, consider these important facts:

 

  • For starters, it is virtually impossible to sell or submit an idea to any major company without first filing a patent. Most invent help companies do not protect your idea or invention by filing a patent for you. To protect your invention from the get-go, it is best to try to obtain a patent from the USPTO on your own.  For help with filing a first-time patent, seek the advice of a patent attorney. Be on the lookout: Companies that advertise the ability to file your patent for only $99 are definitely SCAMS and should be avoided altogether.

 

  • Second, most companies will not do a patent search to make sure your invention does not already exist. Invent help companies are in the business to make money, so they don’t necessarily mind taking yours. It is important to pay out of your own pocket for a patent search before deciding to move forward with any invention.  Submitting an idea, only to find out someone has a patent on something very similar, results in lost money and wasted effort.

 

  • Next, the fees for providing inventor services, professional patent illustrations, attorney fees, publicity and submissions to the industry are all additional.  These fees will not be absorbed by any invent help company, and you may actually be charged more than you would by seeking these services on your own. One way or another you will still have to pay for all professional services related to your invention, so why not have control over what you pay to whom?

 

  • Finally, know the statistics.  Invent help services cannot and should never claim to guarantee the success of any product idea. Inventor Spot Forum recently posted these statistics published by one major invent help company:

 “From 2003 to 2005, we signed submission agreements with 6,592 clients. As a result of our services, 119 clients have received license agreements for their products, and 15 clients have received more money than they paid us for these services.”

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Obviously this confirms that a person’s success rate is not guaranteed.

 

Everyone knows that all good things take time, hard work, and dedication.  You are the inventor, so be serious about taking the right steps toward protecting your invention before seeking promotional help from any one of the ideas-made-simple “invent help” companies. If you need professional help illustrating your idea, be sure to contact Inventia Patent Drafting right away!

Why A Good Patent Drawing is Important

A picture may be worth a thousand words, but a good patent drawing may prevent a thousand frustrations. First-time patent applicants, who might accidentally omit something in the written disclosure of a patent application, should know that a detailed patent drawing can potentially save that application from rejection.

A good patent drawing is a drawing that is detailed enough to visually convey pertinent information about an invention, including information that might be missing in the actual written description.

If you are a new inventor, and you want your invention to pass without question, then consider broadening the scope of your application by including multiple, detailed and professional drawings with your filing.

The primary benefit of filing a patent application is to capture a filing date that can be used to demonstrate priority of your invention. In order to capture the full benefit of a filing date, a good patent application should completely cover all aspects of the invention and all permutations at the time the application is filed.

Simply stated, supplying multiple, but good patent drawings the first time can help expedite the patent application approval process.

Because the detail of the patent drawing is so important, having the work done by a professional patent illustrator is extremely wise. Using a professional is well worth the investment, because a professional is specially trained to deliver a good patent drawing…specifically, the type of detailed drawing that will correctly conform to ever-changing USPTO drawing standards.

Hiring a professional patent illustrator such as Inventia Patent Drafting is more affordable than you think.  Depending on the complexity of the drawing, charges typically range somewhere between $50 and $150 per sheet.

Compared to the potential cost of application rejection, the valuable time lost in re-filing, and the headaches associated with completely starting over….good patent drawings are worth every dime.

Why You Need a Professional Patent Illustrator

First time inventors often ask if they really need to hire a professional patent illustrator to draw their idea.  Hiring a certified patent illustrator is not only important to the success of your patent application, but a huge time saver…and headache deterrent for you. Career inventors and multiple patent owners agree: professional patent illustrators not only protect your design from USPTO rejection, but can often spot inconsistencies that an IP attorney might miss.

A professional patent illustrator is important because they make it their business to stay informed about current USPTO Standards for Drawings.  Those standards start with utilizing the most widely accepted drawing method: black and white line art.  Black and white drawings also known as line art must be used for patent drawing submissions.  Today’s professional patent Illustrators also use modern software to help them quickly create precise drawings that meet ink requirements while simultaneously adhering to other strict USPTO drawing standards.

For patent drawings to be accepted, they must also include:

  • Identification of the drawings: Identifying indicia should include the title of the invention, inventor’s name, and application number, or docket number (if any) if an application number has not been assigned to the application. If this information is provided, it must be placed on the front of each sheet within the top margin.
  • Graphic forms in drawings. Chemical or mathematical formulas, tables, and waveforms may be submitted as drawings and are subject to the same requirements as drawings. Each chemical or mathematical formula must be labeled as a separate figure, using brackets when necessary, to show that information is properly integrated.
  • Margins. The sheets must not contain frames around the sight (i.e., the usable surface). Each sheet must include top and left side margins of at least 2.5 cm., a right side margin of at least 1.5 cm., and a bottom margin of at least 1.0 cm., thereby leaving a sight no greater than 17.0 cm. by 26.2 cm. on DIN size A4 drawing sheets, and a sight no greater than 17.6 cm. by 24.4 cm. (6 15/16 by 9 5/8 inches) on 21.6 cm. by 27.9 cm. (8 1/2 by 11 inch) drawing sheets.
  • Views. Patent drawings must contain as many views as necessary to show the invention. They may be plan, elevation, section, or perspective views. Detail views of portions of elements, on a larger scale if necessary, may also be used. All views of the drawing must be grouped together and arranged on the sheet(s) without wasting space, preferably in an upright position, clearly separated from one another, and must not be included in the sheets containing the specifications, claims, or abstract.

There are many more specific USPTO guidelines including the arrangement of the views, scaling, symbols, and legends.  Still wondering why you might need a professional patent Illustrator?  Read the General Information Concerning Patents here, and contact Inventia Patent Drafting for help today.